Moving is a Big Deal!

moving

Summer is over and I’m getting lots of questions all of the sudden about moving elderly parents. Some are moving to assisted living facilities in different states to be near different family members, others are moving in with their children, while others are moving to a higher level of care. In all cases, expect a move of residence to have a noticeable effect on the emotions of your loved one, at least temporarily.

Usually, it’s just a matter of adjustment. As things settle in after a few weeks and new routine takes hold, a comfort level sets in. Sometimes, it is a bigger adjustment.

Involving your loved one in many details of the move, in my opinion, can be a mistake. It can cause anxiety and heart ache. It might set everyone involved on edge. Keep it simple and be very respectful. You might be sorry if you think they’ll feel better being involved. Test with a few questions and see what response you get. Does it make them happy to be involved or do they change the subject or get angry? It requires more patience, but you will have a much better experience and a happier outcome for all concerned if your mom/dad is not reminded constantly of details about a move they’re often not happy about in the first place. If it’s time for you, the caregiver, to be in charge, than gently take charge.

Make the decisions about what can be included in the move generously. Having as many familiar pieces of furniture and pictures around as possible can make a huge difference in anxiety level. If you’re moving from one town to another, is it possible to put some things in a storage place, costing maybe $100 for about a month, to see how things go? It could be money well spent and you’ll know in short time if some things are not missed or needed. When your mom says, where’s my tray table?, I need it so I can sit in front of the TV while I eat, you will be able to honestly say, it’s safe, we couldn’t bring it on the plane, but it’s coming. Think of the sadness you’d both feel if you had to tell her you gave it away. With that said, it’s not going to be a perfect situation no matter what you do. If you do your best, you’ll know it’s all that could have been done. And that is perfect.

On moving day, be compassionate. If possible, have family or friends take your loved one away from the commotion before it starts and keep them from seeing all their possessions being moved. It’s a very emotional experience that can, hopefully, be avoided. If it’s a long distance move, I’m sure there will be a competent loving person accompanying your loved one. Doing all the moving-in and arranging before they arrive will make it much easier on your mom/dad. They can move things around to their liking later, but you’ll save them from possible disorientation, confusion and maybe depression. Keep things simple and uncluttered whenever possible for less confusion.

In my experience, when the higher levels of care are required, as in cases of advanced Alzheimer’s patients, the confusion caused by new surroundings can be permanent. It’s a sign that the disease is advancing. The Caregiver now needs to be more aware. Expect the unexpected. If you’re managing your loved ones care, and they live in a separate residence, you’ll want to ask more questions of the staff about behavior and the level of interest in socializing. Understand that people are still very clever when elderly and always want to be in control of their own lives. We all do, it’s human nature. Wandering into other residents rooms and “borrowing things” is very common. The management of a facility will not be shocked if a watch or purse is missing. Hiding things of value and not remembering where they are happens to the best of us! Sometimes pictures are gone from a photo album and found in another’s room. It’s just that a wandering resident found them interesting. They can easily be returned. Patience and compassion goes a long way here. For more information on this subject, please read my past blogs: Alzheimer’s I & II.

As in everything involved in Caregiving, your own good judgement about the individual situation is the best you can bring to the table. You have resources, you’re not alone. Please feel free to ask me questions and send me your stories. I love hearing from you.

Until soon, I wish you love and compassion.

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